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Updated EU climate plans: opportunities for businesses at national level

Ambitious, achievable and beneficial for Europe” is how European Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen, characterized her updated EU climate plans. She unveiled her proposal to cut CO2 emissions by 55% by 2030 during her first State of the Union Speech on 16 September. New measures to reach the objective will affect all sectors of the economy from transport, construction to energy. It accelerates the transition to a climate-neutral Europe by 2050, as laid down in the overarching European Green Deal. Therefore, the European Commission is also calling on Member States to step up their efforts. The updated climate targets on a European level provide a unique framework and opportunity for businesses to shape and be part of the green transition at national level.

Stepping up our climate efforts: “We can do it!”

The Commission based the increased 55% target on an assessment of the National Energy and Climate Plans for 2021-2030 (NECPs). The NECPs are ten-year plans, in which EU Member States outline how they will address climate-related issues such as energy efficiency, taking up renewables, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, interconnections and research & innovation. The evaluation of these national climate plans on EU-level showed that the EU is to surpass the current 40% reduction target, enabling the increase of the target to 55% by 2030. Or in Von der Leyen’s words: “we can do it!” As this demands a further increase of energy efficiency and the share of renewable energy, the Commission will present new proposals by June 2021:

  • The Renovation Wave: the renovation of public and private buildings to improve their energy efficiency;
  • Revision of the Energy Efficiency Directive: the alignment of the binding measures that limit energy consumption with the new climate targets;
  • Guidance for the Energy Efficiency First Principle: ensuring energy saving is a priority in policy-making and investment.

In addition to the EU-level evaluation of the National Energy and Climate Plans, the Commission will carry out an assessment of Member States’ individual plans in October, as part of the State of the Energy Union Report, expected by the end of the year. The assessment will evaluate if Member States are on track to achieve the current 40% and proposed 55% emission reduction targets, looking at areas such as energy efficiency and the share of renewables in the national energy mix as mentioned above.

Opportunities to shape the national green recovery

Expectedly, Member States will have to bring their National Energy and Climate Plans in line with the new emission reduction target, if it is approved by the European Parliament and the Council of the EU. Although the new objective may look challenging, combined with the Recovery and Resilience Facility, it offers a unique opportunity for businesses to become part of the green recovery in their countries. The Recovery and Resilience Facility is at the core of the Next Generation EU plan and offers an unprecedented €672.5 billion of loans and grants to Member States to emerge from the COVID-19 crisis. The budget is to be spent in line with the (increased) European climate ambitions. In order to benefit from the budget, Member States draft their national recovery plans outlining how these will contribute to criteria including environmental sustainability.

European Green Deal Impact Scan

As a result, a momentum arises for businesses to help national governments shape a sustainable recovery. Additionally, companies can benefit from European investment in the green ‘flagship areas’ that are to be included in the national plans. These focus areas include the development of renewables, energy efficiency of buildings and sustainable charging and refueling technologies for transport. With the deadline for preliminary drafts of Member States’ national recovery plans set on 15 October, now is the moment to deliver input.

Next steps

The Climate Law Regulation was proposed by the European Commission in March 2020 and is currently being discussed in the European Parliament and Council of the EU. The institutions will need to come to an agreement and approve the 55% emission reduction target. Next to that, Member states are invited to submit their preliminary draft plans under the Recovery and Resilience Facility as of 15 October 2020. The final deadline for submission is 30 April 2021.

With the first deadline for the National Recovery and Resilience Plans fast approaching, it is important to timely deliver input in order to have your ideas heard. If you would like more information on the EU climate plans, or other files that could impact your business, contact Dr2 Consultants. Also, visit our Sustainability webpage for more information.

 

 

All eyes on Berlin as Germany starts the Council Presidency

On 1 July, Germany took over the Presidency of the Council of the EU from Croatia, for the second half of 2020, which is already dubbed the ‘Corona-Presidency’. The upcoming six months will bring historic challenges as the management of the recovery from the current health crisis will coincide with some fundamental political choices in the EU, and the outcome will determine the future direction of European integration.

As one of the most powerful Member States of the EU takes over at this crucial moment in time, it will have to play multiple roles at the same time.

Crisis management

First and foremost, the German Presidency will have to play its role as ‘crisis manager’ in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on epidemiological developments and assessments, the German Presidency will seek to increase coordination in Europe to gradually return to a fully functioning Schengen Area. Furthermore, Germany is expected to lead the politically complicated negotiations on potentially expanding the list of third countries from which travel to the EU is allowed. These priorities will be central during the whole German Presidency mandate.

EU budget negotiations

Germany will also take an active part in managing the negotiations on the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) 2021-2027 and the Next Generation EU Recovery Fund during the summer months. The main challenge will be to find common ground between the hard-hit Member States, such as Italy, Spain and France on the one hand, and the ‘frugal four’ – Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden – on the other hand, with the latter group being against grants as part of the Recovery Fund. Germany will be directly responsible for the legislative work on the different sector programs within the MFF (e.g. Horizon Europe, Just Transition Fund and InvestEU) and the Recovery Fund, and will lead the trilogue negotiations with the European Parliament on the financial framework, once there is political agreement on the general features of the future budget. France and Germany expressed their ambition for a quick agreement by end of July, as European leaders are set to meet face-to-face on 17 and 18 July.

Brexit negotiations

With the Brexit transition period ending on the 31 December 2020 and the United Kingdom declining the opportunity to extend this deadline, the German Presidency will have yet another prospective challenge. Once an agreement has been reached at European Commission level, the Member States will have to give their consent. German EU ambassador Michael Clauss stressed that Germany will be exclusively focusing on “brokering agreements between the 27”.

The German Presidency program expresses the Presidency’s ambition for a comprehensive partnership between the EU and the UK. However, it also reads that the Member States will not accept an agreement that would distort fair competition within the Single Market. If there is an acceptable agreement before the end of the year, the German Presidency is expected to align Member States in its role as ‘Brexit-Broker’.

Work program

The work program sets out, in broad terms, the policy priorities for the second half of 2020. In general, Germany will prioritize the digital and green transitions throughout all of its activities. The German Presidency is committed to an innovative Europe based on three pillars: expanding the EU’s digital sovereignty, enhancing competitiveness and a sustainable and stable financial architecture. It will also ensure that the Green Deal’s implementation will contribute to the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe.

The German Presidency will have an extremely challenging task of fostering European unity in the budget negotiations in the face of existing difficulties such as the COVID-19 crisis and Brexit. For more information on the German Presidency’s sector-specific priorities, please read our analyses of the German priorities in the fields of digital & tech, sustainability and transport: